All posts filed under: Announcements

Call For Papers: Issue 29, “Beyond Love”

For its twenty-ninth issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that address the complex and multiple meanings of love. According to Freud, “it is always possible to bind together a considerable number of people in love, so long as there are other people left over to receive the manifestations of their aggressiveness.” Is love beyond us? Whether it connotes a delusion, state, obsession, rupture, failure, family, intimacy, or self, love eludes and mystifies. Mutable, primordial, and accumulable, it persists as a permanent horizon, accessible to everyone. In recent events the demand for love has emerged again and again, echoing the the failed and cyclical nature of past desires. Even as past desires are fulfilled–either by the state, the family, physically, spiritually–the hope for love remains, its forms and conceptions ever changing. For IVC 29, we invite contributors to explore visual representations and contestations of the concept of love. What does love look like? How is it displayed? What are the conditions and/or/of possibilities for love? Where do …

Call For Papers: Issue 28, Contending with Crisis

For its twenty-eighth issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that address the complex and multiple meanings of contending with crisis. Defined by the global uncertainty of a world afflicted by varied and ambiguously interrelated states of emergency, the present can be seen as a critical historical conjuncture characterized by crisis. In the context of its worldwide occurrence, crisis refers irreducibly to a multitude of circumstances, events, and thematizations: military conflict, debt crises, issues of political representation, the mass migration and displacement of refugees, increasing ecological disruptions. Such ruptures in the social demand constant attention from individuals and communities, constituting a need for committed artististic and scholarly engagements with questions of what it means to be in crisis and how to deal with it. Following Lauren Berlant’s understanding of crisis as “an emergency in the reproduction of life, a transition that has not found its genres for moving on,” we encourage authors to contemplate the fluidity/liminality of crisis, exploring both its emancipatory and repressive potentials. As an …

Call For Papers: Issue 27, Speculative Visions

For its twenty-seventh issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that address the complex and multiple meanings of speculative visions. The last decade has seen a rise in popularity among science fiction, fantasy, and horror. These genres encourage the capacity to imagine post-human bodies, extraordinary worlds, techno-utopias, and claustrophobic spaces of violence. In their reliance upon the imagination, these speculative visions provide a space to consider contradictions and a carnivalesque interaction between popular culture and critical theory. For Issue 27, we would like contributors to consider a range of questions produced by both historical and contemporary science fiction, fantasy, and horror across all visual media. How are objects transcribed and/or adapted from one medium to another? How do the limitations and possibilities of a medium structure works? How have these genres endured over time beyond their originary forms? How have technological advances altered the literalization of these imagined worlds? We welcome papers and artworks that further the various understandings of speculative visions. Please send completed papers (with …

Call for Papers: Issue 26, Border Crossings

For its twenty-sixth issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that address the complex and multiple meanings of border crossings. In September 2015, a photograph shocked the world by showing the body of a small boy lying facedown on a beach in Bodrum, Turkey. Later identified as Aylan Kurdi from Syria, he and other members of his family perished in a failed attempt to flee to Canada. The image became the focal point of the on-going refugee struggles, confronting us with the power of images, their affective potential, and the politics of representation. IVC Issue 26 seeks to examine how border crossings can challenge the stable, ontological distribution of power, capital, and resources along constructed lines of demarcation. In considering the crossing of a border, we must first understand what constitutes a border and how it performs in the visual field. Globalization tries to dissolve borders through the decentralization of power, yet at the same time, it immanently and symbolically re-inscribes national borders through the unequal distribution …

Launching InVisible Culture Issue 21: Pursuit

InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal of Visual Culture (IVC), published through the University of Rochester’s graduate program in Visual and Cultural Studies, is pleased to announce the launch of Issue 21: “Pursuit.” For this issue, we invited scholars and artists to explore ways pursuit manifests at both the individual and collective levels. What we received revealed the dual nature and contradictory inner-logic of pursuit: its focused trajectory coupled with its tendency to turn back on itself, operating in ways circuitous, surprising, vexing, and destructive. Authors Janet Wolff, Joel Gn Hong Zhan, Christopher Schubert and Timothy Welsh, Carolyn L. Kane, Diego Costa, artists Adam Sulzdorf-Liszkiewicz and Anton Hand, Erin Johnson, Paul Qaysi, Clint Enns, Walter Forsberg contributed articles and works of art that address at least two distinct but interrelated forms of pursuit which we are perpetually undertaking: technological pursuit and spatial pursuit. Issue 21: Pursuit (Fall 2014) IVC is a student run interdisciplinary journal published online twice a year in an open access format. Through peer-reviewed articles, creative works, and reviews of books, films, and exhibitions, our …

Al-Mutanabbi Street: Start The Conversation

Right now al-Mutanabbi street starts somewhere on a small street in Gaza, and in Damascus, on a small street in Beijing, a small street in Tehran. It starts in Baghdad, Beirut, and Cairo, it starts in Dublin, Calgary, Halifax, London, Exeter, and Bristol, and here in San Francisco, Santa Fe, Boston, Los Angeles, Omaha, New York City, Washington D.C.,Cambridge, Mass. or Detroit, Michigan. It starts at the Rochester Central Library, and at Goddard College in Vermont. It starts wherever someone gathers their thoughts to write towards the truth, or where someone sits down and opens a book to read. Wherever the free exchange of ideas is suppressed or attacked, wherever writers and artists are silenced, or risk their lives to speak the truth through their work, there will be a place for them on al-Mutanabbi Street. – Beau Beausoleil, July 2014 In March 2007, a suicide bomber exploded his car in Al-Mutanabbi Street in Baghdad, Iraq, killing thirty people and injuring more than a hundred. The street, named after Abu at-Tayyib Al-Mutanabbi, a renowned classical …

Launching InVisible Culture Issue 20: “Ecologies”

Eddee Daniel, Grip in “Hard Ecology: Rethinking Nature,” in IVC 20. InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal of Visual Culture (IVC), published through the University of Rochester’s graduate program in Visual and Cultural Studies, is pleased to announce the launch of Issue 20: “Ecologies.” For this issue, we explored the “ecological” turn in contemporary visual culture. Furnishing an awareness of habitat, rooted in the Latin verb “it lives,” ecology refers to the dynamism of the natural world. But it also lends to an understanding of the dynamism of different kinds of environments, from the virtual to the visual. Authors Adam Levin, Roberta Buiani, Beatrice Choi and Hans Vermy contributed articles expanding upon these connotations, at the same time reshaping definitions of liveliness, agency, and subjectivity. Issue 20 also features three artworks by Cary Peppermint/Leila Nadir (EcoArtTech), Elçin Maraşlı, and Eddee Daniels that visualize and embody a spectrum of ecologies. Making use of IVC’s open access electronic format, these works take on several forms: artist interview, installation documentation, online book, and photo essay. Issue 20: Ecologies (Spring …

Launching InVisible Culture Issue 19: “Blind Spots”

Detail of Figure 1 in Cooper. InVisible Culture is pleased to announce the release of Issue 19, “Blind Spots.” As stated in the introduction, “Blind Spots” is “the inaugural offering of InVisible Culture‘s new editorial model, wherein theme-driven issues are ideated and produced collaboratively by an editorial board—a departure from the previous guest editor system. In the spirit of continued collaboration, we welcome you as readers of this particularly varied and rich issue of our journal, and enthusiastically invite your comments and feedback as a means of extending the frames of this conversation around visuality and its blind spots.” Thank you–enjoy: Issue 19: Blind Spots (Fall 2013)   InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to explorations of the material and political dimensions of cultural practices: the means by which cultural objects and communities are produced, the historical contexts in which they emerge, and the regimes of knowledge or modes of social interaction to which they contribute.

Announcement Concerning Film and Exhibition Reviews

IVC is expanding its reviews section! InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal of Visual Culture (IVC) now welcomes film and exhibition reviews from emerging and established scholars and critics in addition to book reviews. IVC accepts both contemporary and historical works of film criticism. Submissions that engage with current academic and popular discourses in film, media, visual and cultural studies and place particular aspects of film and filmmaking within broader social, political, and historical contexts are especially encouraged. For exhibition reviews, IVC invites work that addresses the organization, presentation, and curatorial rationale of a particular exhibition. Exhibition reviews should also consider how viewers engage with the exhibition, focusing on specific artworks and themes within the exhibition. Comparative reviews and critical essays on histories, theories, and practices of artmaking, exhibition, and curatorial models – i.e. biennials, retrospectives, social practice in the public sphere, politics of display, etc. – are also welcomed.All submissions should be between 1000 and 1500 words, and should follow IVC style guidelines. Only original, previously unpublished submissions will be considered. For more information and for IVC’s reviews call for submissions, please visit the contribute section of our …

InVisible Culture Blog

We are happy to announce that InVisible Culture will feature an interactive blog. This new feature will present up-to-date, non-peer reviewed content, including exhibition, film, and book reviews that will reflect the current issue as well offer a forum for considering the state of visual culture. Our editorial board will contribute content, but we also invite short form, 1500-word submissions from our readers all of which will complement our peer-reviewed articles and essays. Interested in contributing? Please use our contact form.

Launching InVisible Culture Issue 17: “‘Where Do You Want Me to Start?’ Producing History through Mad Men”

InVisible Culture, published through the University of Rochester’s graduate program in Visual and Cultural Studies, is pleased to announce the release of Issue 17, “’Where Do You Want Me to Start?’ Producing History through Mad Men.” Guest edited by Amanda Graham and Erin Leary, the issue is the first to showcase InVisible Culture’s new platform, aesthetic, and interactive features. The release also coincides with the premiere of the fifth season of the critically acclaimed series. As with any contemporary scholarship, we recognize the arguments and concerns of the first four seasons will evolve along with the show and its characters. Thus, this issue will be supplemented by a series of weekly blog posts by guest bloggers. These posts will reflect the authors’ and editors’ continued scholarship, analysis, and critical viewpoints on the new season. This new section is intended to prompt new approaches to scholarship, and allow for varying formats, thoughts, and interaction. We welcome readers to return each week. InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to explorations of …