Author: IVC Editorial Board

Call For Papers: Issue 27, Speculative Visions

For its twenty-seventh issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that address the complex and multiple meanings of speculative visions. The last decade has seen a rise in popularity among science fiction, fantasy, and horror. These genres encourage the capacity to imagine post-human bodies, extraordinary worlds, techno-utopias, […]

Introduction / Issue 24: Corpus

In spring 2015, when the spread of Ebola invigorated an immune response for countries such as the United States to suspend air-travel in the face of a deadly epidemic, we speculated on vulnerabilities that loomed within and beyond the realm of public health. From ISIS to continuous global and environmental crises, the media’s pronouncement of […]

Call for Papers: Issue 26, Border Crossings

For its twenty-sixth issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that address the complex and multiple meanings of border crossings. In September 2015, a photograph shocked the world by showing the body of a small boy lying facedown on a beach in Bodrum, Turkey. Later identified as […]

Contributors / Issue 23: Blueprints

Issue 23: Blueprints (Fall 2015) William Fairbrother is a non-anthropocentric artist, designer, writer and researcher living and working in London. He recently graduated from the Royal College of Art with a masters in Information Experience Design, and has a background in Archaeology and Anthropology, achieving a first class bachelors at Durham University. Visit his site: http://www.williamfairbrother.co.uk Jim Middlebrook instructs […]

Call for Papers: Issue 25, Security and Visibility

For its twenty-fifth issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that explore the concept of security and visual culture. For almost two decades, both scholarly and public interests in matters of national security and the corresponding surveillance of public space have increased immensely. Notions of visibility figure […]

Contributors / Issue 22: Opacity

Guillermina De Ferrari (PhD Columbia University) is professor of Spanish and Director of the Center for Visual Cultures at University of Wisconsin-Madison. She specializes on Caribbean literature and visual culture. Her book Vulnerable States: Bodies of Memory in Contemporary Caribbean Fiction (2007) studies the trope of the vulnerable body in contemporary Caribbean literature. Her book Community and Culture in […]

Introduction / Issue 20: Ecologies

Visual culture scholars have long asserted that things lead social lives, linking up and separating as they traverse networks. In particular, ideas about the flow of commodities across national, geographical, cultural, and linguistic borders have directed critical attention to how global networks connect previously isolated peoples and cultures.1 But as the interdisciplinary venture of visual […]

Introduction / Issue 19: Blind Spots / Contributors

Introduction For its nineteenth issue, InVisible Culture presents articles, artworks, and reviews under the thematic framework of “Blind Spots.” Each of the pieces contained within this issue address various “spots” or points of blindness. These range from the actual experiences of non-sighted people to the instability of vision itself, from blindness as a symptom or […]

Introduction / Issue 18 / Making Sense of Visual Culture

Alicia Inez Guzmán and Alexander Brier Marr As the first generation of PhDs trained in visual culture programs settles into tenured positions and important curatorships, our field continues to grow in ways that its founders hardly anticipated. An expanding institutional network encourages a rethinking of vision and visuality, two key terms in visual studies. In […]

Contributors / Issue 18

Guest Editors Alicia Inez Guzmán is a Doctoral Candidate in the program in Visual and Cultural Studies Program at the University of Rochester. Her research focuses on the visual culture from and about the Southwest, particularly New Mexico. Alexander Brier Marr is a Doctoral Candidate in the program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University […]

Launching InVisible Culture Issue 17: “‘Where Do You Want Me to Start?’ Producing History through Mad Men”

InVisible Culture, published through the University of Rochester’s graduate program in Visual and Cultural Studies, is pleased to announce the release of Issue 17, “’Where Do You Want Me to Start?’ Producing History through Mad Men.” Guest edited by Amanda Graham and Erin Leary, the issue is the first to showcase InVisible Culture’s new platform, […]

Contributors / Issue 17: Through the Looking Glass, and What We Found There

Guest Editors Amanda Jane Graham is a Doctoral Candidate in the Visual and Cultural Studies program at the University of Rochester.  She has an M.A. in Communication and Culture from York University and a M.S. in Education from Brooklyn College.  A former New York City public school teacher and community organizer, Amanda is interested in […]

Introduction / Issue 16: The Cultural Visualization of Hurricane Katrina

It has been nearly six years since Hurricane Katrina ripped through the Gulf of Mexico cutting a swathe of devastation and shock through the psyche of the American people. Exacerbated by the recent BP oil spill in the region, the storm and its aftermath remains an open wound for local residents and others affected by the disaster,leaving many […]

Contributors / Issue 16: The Cultural Visualization of Hurricane Katrina

Contributors Nicola Mann is a Ph.D. candidate in the Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester, New York. Nicola received a first class B.A. in Fine Art from the University of Creative Arts, Surrey, and an M.A. in Painting from the Royal College of Art, London. Mann’s dissertation draws on the interpretative […]

Contributors / Issue 15: Spectacle East Asia

Issue 15: Spectacle East Asia (Fall 2010) Sohl Lee is a Ph.D. student in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester, U.S.A. She is currently working on her dissertation, which investigates works by contemporary artists who practice sociopolitical interventions into national identity, urban development, ethics, and contemporaneity in South […]

Introduction / Issue 14: Aesthetes and Eaters

Issue 14: Aesthetes and Eaters – Food and the Arts (Winter 2010) Introduction: Help Yourself Alexandra Alisauskas In 2006, Documenta 12 director Roger Buergel announced Ferran Adrià’s inclusion in the 2008 fair. Best known as an avant-garde chef specializing in sensory-challenging, conceptual cuisine at his restaurant El Bulli, Adrià’s place on the roster of artists marked the […]

Contributors / Issue 14: Aesthetes and Eaters

Issue 14: Aesthetes and Eaters – Food and the Arts (Winter 2010) Issue Contributors    Alexandra Alisauskas is a Ph.D. student in the Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY. She is currently researching for her dissertation on art collectives and theories of the body in the period of Soviet transition, particularly […]

Introduction / Issue 13: After Post-Colonialism?

Issue 13: After Post-Colonialism? (Spring 2009) Maia Dauner and Cynthia Foo This issue of Invisible Culture addresses an enormous topic with a mix of trepidation and humility: what role do post-colonial theorizations of identity and politics play in contemporary visual culture? How are the methodologies of thinkers such as Homi Bhabha, Gayatri Spivak, Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, […]

Contributors / Issue 13: After Post-Colonialism?

Issue 13: After Post-Colonialism? (Spring 2009) Issue Contributors Maia Dauner is a Ph.D. candidate in the Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester. She is writing her dissertation entitled “Playing Dead: Corporeal Confusion and Performance Art.” Her research interests include contemporary art, performance, post-colonial theory, and institutionalized multiculturalism. Cynthia Foo is […]

Introduction / Issue 11: Curator and Context

Issue 11: Curator and Context (2007) Mara Gladstone A person discerns meaning, significance, or value from every aesthetic encounter, as each art object is presented to the world laden with ideas. Yet the contexts of experiencing art, by working within or against authorial intention, affect one’s impressions of it, perhaps producing incomplete or imperfect interpretations. […]

Contributors/Issue 10: The Symptom

Dale Bradley is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Communications, Popular Culture, and Film at Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.  His research interests include the discursive analysis of contemporary technoculture and the historical emergence of cybersociety. He can be reached at dbradley@brocku.ca. Sudeep Dasgupta is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and […]

Introduction / Issue 9: Nature Loving

Issue 09: Nature Loving (Fall 2005) Lisa Uddin and Peter Hobbs In the opening sequences of Luc Jacquet’s recent film for National Geographic, March of The Penguins (2005), audiences are shown spectacular vistas of a barren Antarctic landscape. The ice-covered backgrounds are punctuated by tiny, black figures waddling across the horizon. The warm and knowing narration of […]